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Malvina Blanchecotte (Biography)

Poetry Translation Women in Literature

Malvina Blanchecotte (Biography)

Autodidact, seamstress, teacher, single mother, poet   In 1830, the Souvilles, a working class family in Paris, had a baby girl. Augustine Alphonsine Malvina was largely self-taught and learned English, German, and Latin. She married an accountant by the name of Blanchecotte in 1850. However, he was eventually hospitalized for a mental illness, and she was left to raise their son alone. She worked as a seamstress and bookkeeper, and later as a teacher. Malvina Blanchecotte participated in the salon of Louise Colet, a fellow poet, and made the acquaintance of other writers, including George Sand (Schultz 136). Lamartine, in...

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"A UNE INCONNUE" by Malvina Blanchecotte

Poetry Translation Women in Literature

"A UNE INCONNUE" by Malvina Blanchecotte

You are probably wondering who Malvina Blanchecotte is. She is an obscure member of a largely ignored group of writers: women poets of the 19th century. I would like to do a series of posts about her life and work, beginning with some of her own words.  A UNE INCONNUE.Vous qui, lisant mes vers, avez compris mon âme,Qui, me tendant la main, avez dit : Me voici !Vous qui voyez des pleurs sous mon voile de femme,     Oh ! vous avez souffert aussi !Dimanche 23 october 1854. Since most of Blanchecotte's work is not available in English, I've provided...

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Lindbergh by Torben Kuhlmann (Review)

Book Review

Lindbergh by Torben Kuhlmann (Review)

One might expect this book to be about the famous American aviator who flew solo across the Atlantic. It's not. It's about a mouse, a German mouse who wants to go to America because someone has, in fact, built a better mousetrap. (Cue There are no cats in America.)The cover caught my eye while I was browsing a bookstore in France. I saw a mouse on an airplane, and I was sold. The story is an inspirational tale of inventiveness and perseverance. I did see a review that accused it of being predictable, which is fair, but do we want...

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The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place by Julie Berry (Review)

Book Review Women in Literature

The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place by Julie Berry (Review)

When their headmistress and her brother suddenly and mysteriously drop dead, the seven students of St. Etheldreda's School for Girls react unconventionally; they bury the bodies and pretend nothing happened.On the surface, this young adult book is an absurdist (in the best way possible) dark comedy about a group of girls making an unethical, illegal, and ultimately unsustainable decision to cover up a murder. However, it's the reason for this farce that is the most interesting. Each of these girls is underestimated by her family and doesn't quite fit into the position that Victorian life has laid out for her....

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Building a Better Book Weight

New Product Sewing

Building a Better Book Weight

Now that I am back in the US and have survived the holidays, I am working on book weights again. You may have noticed that this new batch of book weights is a bit different than the original ones. I have switched from glass weights to steel weights. While steel is more expensive, there are numerous advantages to this: The weights are now slimmer and more streamlined, while weighing the same as the old ones. The weights can now be shipped in bubble mailers, rather than boxes, which will save customers money on shipping. This is particularly important, given the...

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